A Fast Look at Interactive User Interfaces

Interactive UI elements are becoming a big trend in 2015, especially with animated elements. These UI designs do their best to simulate a “mobile application” feel, on the web, which can include animated menu options, sliding and growing elements, and more. In the past, designers had to rely on clunky options like Flash to achieve this look, but the rise of HTML5 has led to more streamlined, speedier options for both designers and users alike.

A Fast Look at Interactive User Interfaces

In this article, we’ll look at some of the great benefits of going with an interactive, animated user interface, along with considerations to remember so that you don’t leave anyone out in the cold after you deploy your site.

A Fast Look at Interactive User Interfaces
  • Engagement. Have you ever given a cat a toy, and a paper bag? The same experiment can work with babies, but here’s the general idea: It’s a basic item, but it has features, dimensions, weights, and sounds that are fascinating. That’s part of the idea with interaction with your user interface: You can put as many shiny buttons on the user interface as you want, but if it doesn’t look natural, and it doesn’t look inviting, it won’t be as well received as the plain paper bag. In this case, we’re referring to designs that mimic the look of natural materials and shapes. These are what really get the attention of your average visitor. With the use of ideals like Google’s “Material Design,” and other flat design aesthetics mixed in, you can create some extremely realistic “paper” surface designs, for example, that are as intuitive as they are intriguing.
  • Performance. With the right amount of interactivity, you can actually pack a great deal of features into a smaller amount of loading and processing, as long as you’re smart. Loading down your UI with unnecessary sounds and animations will hinder your efforts on this front, but with the same flat “front page” design, you can load in areas where users can click or swipe for more information, contact details, and more. The best part about these single, one stop shops is that they’re easy to share, and you can see lower “bounce back” rates as users explore all of the information that your interactive UI can offer.
  • But for the rest of your audience… Don’t ignore those visitors that want to cut through the mystique of your user interface. There may be users who just want to get your contact information, or who want to find a very specific piece of information without any animations. That’s why it’s good to have a javascript-free version of the site, or quick links that can take visitors to some of your more frequented content. You can use analytic tools to determine how users behave on your site, including the amount of time it takes them to get from point A to point B. This is how you can really streamline your user interface, and discover which features are effective.

WebS Group